Expert Q&A

Why does my dog often fixate on motionless objects as though they are food or moving prey? Is it possible that my dog would need glasses … if he could get them?

Why does my dog often fixate on motionless objects as though they are food or moving prey? Is it possible that my dog would need glasses … if he could get them?

BY: The Dog Daily Expert

We tend to think of animals as having super sensory abilities, and that is true for some senses. Your dog, for example, has smelling skills that could be up to 1 million times more sensitive than those of humans. It’s no wonder that canines seem to sniff everything in sight.

Vision is a different story for dogs. We actually rely more on our sense of vision than canines do, according to Arden Moore, author of The Dog Behavior Answer Book. Moore explains that canine eyes are more sensitive to movement and light, but we are better able to focus on objects.

Moore explains that dogs possess large pupils and a wide field of vision. They can see a bird flying around that you might otherwise ignore, but they are also nearsighted. As a result, it takes dogs a while to process objects that, to us, aren’t very far away. Your dog doesn’t need glasses, though. His vision likely compares with that of other canines.

One thing your dog does excel at: peripheral vision. Without turning his head, your dog can see a 250-degree field of vision. If you think your canine pal is staring at you covertly sometimes, you’re probably right.


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