How Dogs React to Human Infants

By Brad Kloza

How Dogs React to Human Infants

When Lena Harris got pregnant with her second child, her German shepherd, Guinness, started acting overly attentive and clingy, as if he’d sniffed out the forthcoming addition to the pack.

“As I got further in the pregnancy, he became more hyper about herding me,” recalls Harris. “He followed me into every room; he even ignored the door bell, which usually drives him crazy. By the ninth month I swear it was like he wanted to either deliver the baby himself or give me a ride to the hospital.”

Imagined Behavior or Real Baby Detection?
Dog behavior expert Colleen Pelar, author of Living With Kids and Dogs … Without Losing Your Mind, says Guinness’ sixth sense isn’t surprising. Studies show that dogs are capable of sniffing out human cancers, so Pelar suspects they can detect other biological changes.

“I don’t think they have a concept of gestation or pregnancy,” she says. “But the dog is responding to the idea that something is different.’”

Even if dogs can anticipate a new family member, that doesn’t mean they know how to handle it. Here are some tips for getting them properly prepared and acclimated:

Make Changes Early

As a pregnancy progresses, life will inevitably change for your dog. You’ll give your pet less attention, and his or her usual mealtimes will likely become less punctual. It’s best to implement such expected changes gradually in the months leading to the birth. “This way, the dog doesn’t experience all these big changes at once and associate them with the baby’s arrival,” says Pelar.

Bring Home a Blanket

After the baby is born, bring home the baby’s swaddling blanket for the dog to sniff and “introduce” the dog to the new baby. Pelar says a mistake dads make is to hand over the blanket to the dog, or even play tug-of-war with it. “I get regular phone calls from hysterical mothers because the dog has torn up the blanket,” she says. “Treat it like a baby; Let the dog sniff it as much as you would let it sniff the baby -- not stuff his nose into it for five minutes.”

Store Prepared Treats

Any owner of a hyper dog knows that a Kong toy stuffed with peanut butter is the perfect diversion, providing needed peace and quiet. Prepare them in advance, so you don’t have to make the Kong treat while holding a crying, hungry infant in one arm.

Remember Your Dog

Queens, N.Y., pug owner Liv Keystone made an effort to include her pug in daily activities with the baby. Eventually, the dog was her daughter’s favorite playmate. “She's been so sweet,” says Keystone. “She even lets my daughter pound on her and pull her ears, which she'd never let us do.”

Use Help From Friends

If people offer to help once the baby is born, Pelar says a perfect answer is, “Come over and play with my dog.” Since dogs inevitably lose status and attention when the baby arrives, arranging these kinds of playdates can make up for lost time. “Have them come over and play with the dog for 30 minutes in the yard or take him to the groomer for you,” she says.

Be Patient

This is an ongoing relationship that requires work. A dog that tears up the baby blanket may end up being best pals with the baby from day one. And a dog that is perfectly loving from day one may grow to become jealous and aggressive toward that child once the baby starts crawling.

“There will be ups and downs, just like with siblings,” says Pelar of the dog-baby dynamic. “As long as you keep it on the path that’s mostly good, then you’re succeeding.”

Brad Kloza is a freelance writer and frequent contributor to The Dog Daily. His work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine and Discover.


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Posted on October 13, 2011

Bob says: My dog didnt act any different when we brought home baby john.

Posted on October 12, 2011

D. Warnick says: I am a retired certified military working dog handler who worked with shepherds and belgian malinois. I was 4 years old when I was attacked by a loving family pet German Shepherd who was startled by someone who threw a pack of lit firecrackers at him. The dog knew me my whole 4 years of life. I was draped over the dog's back like a sack of potatoes (absolute trust). The firecrackers caused the dog to rear up, I slid off his back, grabbed his tail trying to hold on and landed on my back. That loving pet proceeded to tear the right side of my face apart before the adults could pull him off. Doctors stopped counting at over 250 stitches. I still have the scars and am fortunate I did not lose my eye. I have never blamed the dog. However, too many children are killed or injured because adults fail to acknowledge the Potential for danger. Never leave an infant or small child alone with any dog...you just never know what may happen to set the dog off. NEVER leave a defenseless child strapped in a child seat on a floor with any dog and step away-even for a moment! I absolutely love all dogs. If you can't control your own dog on your own, don't expose a child to it.

Posted on October 10, 2011

Sam C says: I would not leave a dog alone with a baby or small child for an  instant.  I could post a story a month in the US where the family pet (Germ. SHep or pit bull or other ) mauled and killed a baby. It happened across the street from. Tow German Shepherds at the baby. PLEASE beware.

Posted on October 8, 2011

Elliebean says: now my question is what you do about a golden retriever who has to have it all about her all the time?? shes been extremely clingy even before i became pregnant. im afraid shes gonna think my son is a new chew toy when we bring him home. is there any way we could correct this before it becomes a problem or should we get rid of her all together??

Posted on October 7, 2011

Sarah says: My parents adopted our dog Pebbles (German Shepherd mix?) the week they conceived me. During all three of my mom's pregnancies, Pebbles would follow her around and lay her head on her belly. When she started doing this, my mom realized she's probably pregnant. My dad and her doctor thought she was nuts. Sure enough, my mom was pregnant. One of the dogs they have now, Brandy (Cocker Spaniel/Golden Retriever), was very protective of my cousin when she was younger. Brandy would follow her around. My grandmother wouldn't let the dogs into the room while my cousin napped. As soon as grandma left, the dogs immediately ran into the room to check on the child.

Posted on October 2, 2011

Nancy Serrano says: I love my pets, but NEVER leave a dog alone with your baby. They are not humans they are animals. Take nothing for granted!!!

Posted on October 7, 2011

Steve Jobs says: "I thiink dogs make good toys.

Posted on September 27, 2011

Lisa says: One of the best pieces of advice that I ever got was to have the father or someone else hold the baby when coming home from the hospital. Your dog will be eager to see you after your absence, and you want to have your hands free to greet him/her or let him/her jump on you without having to worry about the baby. You don't want to send the message that the baby is coming between the dog and you. After the initial excitement, I would put the baby carrier on the floor for the dog to check out the newcomer, holding their collar loosely, just in case. They are naturally curious and have to check out anything new. My dog nuzzled and prodded each baby for a good few minutes.

Posted on September 25, 2011

kathy Morelii says: I loved this! When I was pregnant with my son, my dalmation knew it! She was more protective and definetly was protective o the baby!

Posted on September 26, 2011

Pat P. says: When my daughter was pregnant, her rat terrier was very aware of her condition. As she got larger, the dog would climb in her lap and nudge her stomach to get the baby to "play". I did not really believe it until, when she was eight and a half months along, I saw the dog wake up the baby and proceed to play with the moving mass. After the baby was born, she was adopted by a wonderful family. When my daughter went home, the dog was frantic because there was no baby and nothing in her stomach to play with. It took the dog about six months to recover from the loss he perceived.

Posted on September 20, 2011

Steve says: As soon as a pet shows jealous or aggressive behavior to my child I would immediately find a new owner for that pet. It may be a member of the family but in such a case the infant clearly comes first.  The only way that such a situation could be resolved is to remove the pet.--Period!  

Posted on September 19, 2011

Responsible Dog Owner/Lover says: I had German Shepherds while growing up. When I became an adult I bought a Rottiweiler to raise with my 2 sons. She was the runt of her pack but eventually became huge because she was from German Champion bloodlines. I later on bred her with an American Rotti (they are taller and more slim than German) in which she had 4 girls and 1 boy who was the runt. We kept him and sold all the females. Needless to say, she was an inside dog and was wonderful with my kids. She is the smartest dog (yes even smarter than my German Shepherd friends who were K-9 trained by my dad) and was very protective of my sons who grew up with her and my youngest who was born 13 years later. Her son was just as smart as she was and he grew up with my youngest son. He just passed this weekend and it has been very hard on my son because they were best friends, as he was also torn apart when his mom died. Even with them being as smart and loveable as they both were, my husband and I were even smarter-we never left the dogs alone with the children when they were small. My girl Rotti lived to be 15 and my boy Rotti (who was big as a horse due to the German and American bloodlines) would have been 12 on his birthday in a few months. Dogs are instinctive, smart, and the best friends you could ever hope for offering unconditional love but we still have to remember anything that has teeth can bite. I am only glad my grand daughter got to meet my boy Rotti before he died and I unlike her mom (not my son) taught her NOT to pull on the tail or poke and how to pet and interact with the dog in a pleasant and SAFE manner. I am contemplating getting another dog but the heart ache of death is becoming too unbearable as old age sets in.

Posted on September 19, 2011

Responsible Dog Owner/Lover says: I had German Shepherds while growing up. When I became an adult I bought a Rottiweiler to raise with my 2 sons. She was the runt of her pack but eventually became huge because she was from German Champion bloodlines. I later on bred her with an American Rotti (they are taller and more slim than German) in which she had 4 girls and 1 boy who was the runt. We kept him and sold all the females. Needless to say, she was an inside dog and was wonderful with my kids. She is the smartest dog (yes even smarter than my German Shepherd friends who were K-9 trained by my dad) and was very protective of my sons who grew up with her and my youngest who was born 13 years later. Her son was just as smart as she was and he grew up with my youngest son. He just passed this weekend and it has been very hard on my son because they were best friends, as he was also torn apart when his mom died. Even with them being as smart and loveable as they both were, my husband and I were even smarter-we never left the dogs alone with the children when they were small. My girl Rotti lived to be 15 and my boy Rotti (who was big as a horse due to the German and American bloodlines) would have been 12 on his birthday in a few months. Dogs are instinctive, smart, and the best friends you could ever hope for offering unconditional love but we still have to remember anything that has teeth can bite. I am only glad my grand daughter got to meet my boy Rotti before he died and I unlike her mom (not my son) taught her NOT to pull on the tail or poke and how to pet and interact with the dog in a pleasant and SAFE manner. I am contemplating getting another dog but the heart ache of death is becoming too unbearable as old age sets in.

Posted on September 16, 2011

Frankford Williams says: This is the dumbest thing ever, a dog is a dog, you cannot hold a conversation to know his feelings or actions. This is harmful, a dog should not be treated like a human.This child is in trouble with you dog nuts. There are people that love sharks, that don't mean put your child in with a shark, stop the nonsence..some babies are afraid of pets. Use some sense, keep your likes to yourself, give baby a chance.

Posted on September 15, 2011

Martin says: Be very careful and watch closely the dog's reaction to your addition.

Posted on September 10, 2011

Ducklady says: Wouldn't it make more sense for visitors to mind the baby so the owner can play with the dog?

Posted on September 8, 2011

Jojo says: Jennifer says: I feel so sad. 20yrs ago, I had my first and our lab mix would stand by me all the time when I held him. 'misinterpreted' that sign and was afraid. We gave him away. I wish I had known better. OKAY, so now you know better - DO better, and get over it - by now the dog has :(

Posted on September 7, 2011

joan wolfe says: several years ago, I lost my parents and the next week I attended a dinner party.  The person giving the party had a dog that was notorious for being very wary of strangers.  However, when I sat down, he came over, got on the couch and put his head in my lap.  He stayed by my side all evening.  I may be wrong, but I think he somehow knew I was sad and was trying to comfort me.  I will never forget that.  I have seen the dog many times since and he pretty much ignores me.  I am convinced he knew.

Posted on September 6, 2011

Martha A. Durham says: Have we gone mad? These are animals not humans! A Lab just killed a baby in Houston. We cannot make animals into humans....They bring so much love to us but never forget they are animals and can kill in certain circumstances! They are not human.

Posted on August 30, 2011

Mr ManGuyDude says: Don't forget "Never leave your child unattended with the dog, NO MATTER WHAT and never put your child in a situation where you couldn't prevent a mauling. Better to be safe than sorry.

Posted on September 1, 2011

lisa burns says: My children are 11 & 9 my Bison is 8. When a baby under 2yrs visits the dog never leaves their side. Its almost like she is protecting the baby. She allows the baby to pull and tug at her. However, I've been told the dog may be a bite hazard because she doesn't like when the vet touches her or look you in the eye. 

Posted on August 28, 2011

Diana says: 41 years ago September 1st, I had a Doberrman that was 9 months old. I got her at 6 weeks old. I gave birth to my first child on that day. When my husband got home from the hospital the dog had made a nest as if to give birth. She had only had one heat and had not been breed. When i came home from the hospital she had started producing milk. For the rest of her life she mothered my daughter. She would flip the baby's legs around when she had a dirty diaper to let me know she needed changed and when Heather stared walking she would wrap herself around her to keep her from going out of the yard. They were inseparable. Just wanted you to hear my story. She was a wonderful dog.

Posted on August 23, 2011

Jennifer says: I feel so sad. 20yrs ago, I had my first and our lab mix would stand by me all the time when I held him. I misinterpreted that sign and was afraid. We gave him away. I wish I had known better. He was such a loving dog. He even went through a bear attack and came home and we nursed him back to health. I am sad...

Posted on August 11, 2011

Mindy says: I have a 2 yr old Rottweiler mix and he is very protective over my kids. I did want to add though, I'm reading a lot of posts about how people allow their children to pull their dogs tail and poke at them. First off, DON'T let them do it! Even if the dog ACTS like it doesn't bother him/her, because IT DOES bother him/her!! Would you like it if someone was pulling and poking at you? No you wouldn't! and then you wonder why a dog bites or snaps at the child?!? I have always taught my kids to respect the animal in the sense that you should NEVER EVER aggravate him!! It's ok to play with him, but it's not ok to pull and poke at him!!!

Posted on August 4, 2011

Ig says: My dog knew I was pregnant before we did. He protected my stomach and refused to let anyone hug me or touch my belly. He knew I was going on labor also.before out started he was poaching and acting worried, he didnt know what to do.wouldn't you know hours later I began labor! 

Posted on July 19, 2011

kitty says: Of course a dog would be able to tell when a human is pregant: we're both mammals, and have similar types of chemicals. Dogs tell when other pack members are pregnant based on their scent; the scent changes of a pregnant human would no doubt be simliar, and since dogs view their owners as being pack members (and, hopefully, pack LEADERS) they would be inclined to help them.

Posted on July 10, 2011

kittie says: I think dogs should not be around babies period. what is this dog thing these days.

Posted on July 11, 2011

Aaron says: Good article, however, the title was misleading. This article doesn't explain how dogs react to infants, but rather gives pointers on how to incorporate the dog into a infants life.

Posted on July 8, 2011

Kay says: Dianna, I'm 70, had dogs all my life. Had Brittany's since 1980 (17 of them), and just recently had an experience with one of my dogs where he reacted to a serious situation that was going on.   I sat down to take a nap in the receliner, and was suddenly beingly pawed (tore several gashes in my legs) growed and barked at. Upon trying to stand up I almost fell, Made it to the bathroom, and immediately did a sugar count.  It was down to 46.  My doctor is convinced that Chris saved my life.  God bless our dear dear friends.

Posted on July 5, 2011

Askani says: A dog knows a woman is gestating a baby? laughable, insane even, a dog has no conception it is even a dog, it is a creature of instict

Posted on June 7, 2011

marleneskelley@aol.com says: Hello, dog is a doberman not sheperd

Posted on June 18, 2011

Gwen says: The dogs are a adoreable!:)

Posted on June 18, 2011

Doglover47 says: Doglover47 says I just love whippets! I have a 12 year old whippet. She is a really a calm doggie.

Posted on July 4, 2011

PatrickSF says: Common sense dictates dogs have a concept of gestation and pregnancy. Larry is absolutely correct and Fred needs to STHU.  If only "experts" had more common sense.

Posted on May 17, 2011

Miles Auderer says: Dumb Animals? I don't think so....

Posted on May 22, 2011

Gaius says: Our Chow was extremely protective of our newborn daughter when she came home from the hospital. I was concerned how he might adapt, but he was great. When my daughter cried, he would check on her immediately. When he saw everything was ok, he would go on about his business. When I would feed her at night, he would always come and quietly sit by us.

Posted on May 28, 2011

Cathy L says: We rescued a 6 wk old female german shep/Pit & boxer mix. Not only did she watch over me while I was preg.(she was 6) we had a rescued cat that was preg. as well. The cat & dog had such a close bond that when I took the dog for a walk the cat would cry for her. When the cat had kittens the dog came and got me to show me where the cat was. Then she watched that cat all night and the kittens for days. The dog would know when the mama cat needed a break. The dog would watch the kittens, clean them & kept them in their box until mama came back. It was a heart warming experience seeing these two care for eachother!!

Posted on June 3, 2011

Margaret says: I have one question. Why is the woman from Queens, NY letting her child pound on the dog and pull his ears? Why are there comments here with people bragging about how their children abuse their pets and how good their pets take it? All the while they stand by and do nothing. GIVE YOUR PET A BREAK!!! Even very young children can learn "be nice to the doggie (or kitty)". Would she let her child pound or pull the ears of another child? Jeez! I do dog rescue and this type of dog abuse is one reason why some dogs are child-aggressive. These dogs, unfortunately, are very hard to adopt out. Even worse, if they are adopted and harm a child, they are PTS. Even though your dogs are gentle while being abused, PLEASE TRY to teach your children to behave in a humane manner with them. BTW, Fred, Larry is right and I didn't view his post as rude, but just trying to set the record straight so as to avoid misinformation.

Posted on May 13, 2011

Genny says: I never had dogs when I had kids but we did when my sons had their babies. I told them to put the baby on the floor and let the dog look at and smell. It seemed to have worked because our dog loves all 4 of my grandchildren.

Posted on May 13, 2011

Tony says: When I was 8, I had a friend whose mom just gave birth to a little girl. Everyone was happy, but then my friend told me his new sister died. Years later, I found out the whole truth. The family dog ate the baby. It wasn't a vicious breed either; it was some kind of retriever/poodle mix.

Posted on May 13, 2011

Alex says: I have a pitbull that is a year old. My step daughter is 5 and they are best friends when the pit was a puppy the kids were the only ones she would play with. This dog is also my baby she will never leave my side and my husband can call her a 1000 times, but until I tell her to go or I leave she won't move. She barks at my husband when he is wrestling with me or the child as if she is telling him to leave us alone. We recently had a year old baby at our house and as the baby was crawling on the floor she kept putting her mouth over his hand or trying to grab his arm she never actually bit him and I dont think she was trying to hurt him I think she wanted to play with him. I had them both in the chair with me and she was just licking his hand. Im not currently expecting but in the next couple yrs we would like to try so hopefully she takes after our new addition as if it were her own.

Posted on May 15, 2011

David Robinson says: We had a rd doberman named Champ . When my youngest brother was born the then toddler would sleep against the dog like a puppy, crawl all over him, ride him and durring teething would chew on the poor dogs ears. The dog would just lay there and whine until somebody pulled Rob off of him.

Posted on May 11, 2011

animallover says: I have a english bulldog and a doberman. I also have a grandson 10 months old. I trust my dogs but I never leave my doberman out when my grandson is on the floor crawling around. It's a slow process but I rather be safe than sorry. My english bulldog will sit at the feet of the baby and watch his every move and won't let outsiders that come in the home around the baby. Please be a responsible pet owner..If your dog is growling at your grandchildren you need to get rid of the dog or have it trained...Do something before the dog hurts one of the children. If you do nothing and the dog does hurt the children then you only have yourself to blame

Posted on May 11, 2011

Gracie says: Our Mixed Breed Terrier began "nesting" near our daughters birthdate. She took every loose article of clothing, towels,rugs etc.. into her bed. She was getting ready for the new arrival. She was very loving and protective of both our children when they were young.

Posted on May 7, 2011

Kiley says: I loved seeing your comment, Laura D; I grew up around Chows...my parents taught me to respect them as fellow creatures and not rough-house/pull at them (as too many children do due to lack of parental supervision, which ends up with nothing but bites), and they were absolutely fantastic friends!

Posted on March 20, 2011

laura garris says: to charlie please rehome your dogs, you have a serious situation, my god the dog is growling at the children, wake up, get a behavorist in or rehome, you are setting up a situation that will result in a sever injury to your children or worse a fatality.  Your post makes me cringe.

Posted on April 16, 2011

roneida says: but no matter how much you love and trust your dog, NEVER leave the dog alone with the baby, NEVER

Posted on May 7, 2011

Jill says: You should add, never, ever, ever leave the baby alone with any dog...even a small one. It is so upsetting to hear stories where unknowing new parents make that mistake and the dog hurts the child.

Posted on March 7, 2011

Concerned says: You should include in your article how a female dog corrects/comforts her young. I've read stories the dog "attacked the child and killed it" and the headline couldn't be farther from the truth. A female dog corrects it's young by putting it's jaws over the puppy's head and sqeezing until the pup settles down. A crying baby being 'nurtured/corrected' by a female dog will be killed and that is the farthest thing from the dogs mind is to hurt the child. Please be careful to not leave your baby alone with a female dog.

Posted on March 2, 2011

Hpenn says: Our dog Honey followed my wife around and slept at her feet while she st on the couch. Once the baby was born, she(Honey, not my wife) slept in the room on the bed watching over him.

Posted on February 18, 2011

Buster says: And if all else fails, remember you can always put the kid up for adoption.

Posted on February 26, 2011

Sheila says: In the wild, the pack would know if the alpha female is pregrant. They don't need to run to the drugstore and buy a test kit. And why is it whenever we give dogs credit for a special ability that we don't have, it is always their ability to smell? Where that dog would rank on a wild pack hiarchy probably says alot about how he would act. I would guess that the dog in the above article who followed the pregnant woman around would have been an alpha. These are awesome creatures who, even after comign so close to humans, we still underestimate to the point of ignorance.

Posted on February 8, 2011

UnicornDw says: I am a mother of three, a certified vet tech and an animal control officer. I also am the alpha of 3 very large great danes. I personally wouldn't have it any other way. My dogs have been there throughout all the pregnancies, intro of the new pack members and we have NEVER had any problems. I couln't imagine anything without any of them! Dogs and kids! I wouldn't have it any other way!!!

Posted on February 13, 2011

lex says: When my first was born I had an ex-tom cat who thought it was his job to take care of my son. As my son became more mobile the cat would come running if the baby cried and would let the baby do ANYTHING to him to keep the baby from crying including grabbing the cat by his skin and dragging him back and forth. Now I have a young Malamute and she thinks it is her job to care for my great niece when she comes over. Sh even tried to pick up the baby by the scruff of her neck but couldn't find a scruff to latch on to. She definitely thinks that she could take better care of the baby than we mere humans could. Mammals in general have strong reactions to the very young.

Posted on February 2, 2011

Gina says: We could not have been more blessed with our 1/2 price dog (last of the litter) He has been a wonderful dog for 13 years, we have 3 boys 11 and  younger.  He was gentle with them all even letting them mistreat him (the way a toddler does by poking and pulling) to the point I told them all, "If Pete ever takes your hand off it will be well deserved!"

Posted on February 6, 2011

melissa says: my mastiff started getting milk in, even before i knew i was pregnant. she was very protective and loving towards my daughter. it is amazing to see!!

Posted on January 20, 2011

Diann says: You mentioned that dogs can sniff out cancer cells, how exactly do they do it? I am asking because I have had so far non-maligment growths on my head & neck. My GS always is smelling my hair & kissing my head. Is he giving me an insight?

Posted on January 23, 2011

Shadow says: My first shep was "my dog". She grew up with my youngest daughter and was her protector, guardian and friend. The little girl could do anything to Pepper. One day I was playing with my now toddler daughter who was screaming with delight. "MY SHEP" approached me and bared her teeth with a growl which said to me; "Be careful with my Baby." I did.

Posted on January 24, 2011

Dot says: I clicked on the article because of the wonderful picture of the Dobie. That is exactly how my Dobie was with my new daughter, from day 1. It's usually the owners/parents and even grandpararents that cause a problem.

Posted on January 27, 2011

charlie says: have a 3 yr old pitbull and a 7mo old pitbull. had both since small pups, my three yr old acting weird they eat together but wont sit or lay together and the 3 yr old acts like shes not wanted but shes not i share attention equally in every way. the prob is im worried about my grandchildren she is growling at them sometimes always has help

Posted on January 20, 2011

teremist says: As a dog owner, all my life, I have always been interested in dog behavior. This article covers the very basics. Dogs, watch the pack leader for cues, hopefully that is the owner. Teach the dog with treats to bring you the diaper bag. (or a small bag with a few diapers.) Before the baby is born. Let him inspect new things like the crib. Reward the smallest positive behavior, and even when you can't play with him, talk to the dog often, to give them the sense they have not lost status.

Posted on January 15, 2011

Fred says: and what, Larry, are your qualifications that make you an "expert"? And, where did Colleen badmouth you in her article? If only people like you could submit comments that weren't so obviously and intentionally rude, the world would be a better place.

Posted on January 18, 2011

Laura D says: I've always had Chows; and when my first child was born I was extremely cautious (as I would be around any dog)- but as time progressed not only was he my son's guardian; but best and gentle friend.

Posted on January 19, 2011

girardo says: German Shepards are my favourite dog; they can do no wrong. It's been a while since I've had one, but growing up we always had a GS. The story of "Guiness" the German Shepard gives me a good smile and recollection. German Shepards are fiercely loyal. If Guiness' keepers read this, please give Guiness a pat from a long distance friend on the West Coast.

Posted on January 8, 2011

Larry Moniz says: It appears "expert" Collen Pelar hasn't spent much time around dogs. Gestation and pregnancy are primal in, and understood by all animals. Just watch other dogs around a female in heat. A dog's sense of smell is far more acute than humans. To say that dogs don't understand gestation and pregnancy is to admit a total LACK of understanding about animal biology.

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